Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
WSAR
WSAR Listen Live
Fox Sports Radio every weekend on WSAR
Tony From the Right Saturdays at 11
The World According to Dr. Mike Monday through Thursday 9 to 11 AM
Tuesdays: Law Talk 1, Crusin with Bill 2
Alan Combs and America Overnight Weeknights at 10
Patriots and Bills Sunday Oct 2 on WHTB at 10am; Kick at 1pm
Total Life Conditioning with Dr Ross Thursdays at 1
Red Sox and Yankees Wednesday from NYC on WSAR at 6:20pm
The WSAR Newsroom Weekdays at Noon
Fridays: Ask Your Pharmacist 1, Arts & Entertainment 2
Lars Larson Weeknights at 6
Wednesdays: Voice of Business 1, C U Wednesdays 2
People on Education; A Service of People Inc Friday at 11am on WSAR
The Financial Planning Hour with Richard Bassett Mondays at 1
Everything Auto Sundays at Noon brought to you by Mike's Auto Body
Voice of Business with Rob Mellion Wednesdays at 1
Rapid Fire with Ric Oliveira Monday through Thursday 4 to 6, Friday 3 to 6
The Sixth Floor Report Fridays at 9 AM
The Ray Mitchell Show Monday through Thursday 11 to Noon
The Third Degree with Chris Carreiro Monday through Thursday 3 to 4
Red Sox and Yankees from NYC Tuesday on WSAR at 6:20pm
High School Football Saturday at 1pm on WSAR
Yankees and Red Sox from NYC Thursday on WSAR at 6:20pm
Sox and Rays Friday on WSAR at 6:25pm
Red Sox and Rays Saturday on WSAR at 5:25pm
Red Sox and Rays Sunday on WSAR at 12:20pm
The First Presidential Debate Monday September 26 live from ABC Radio on WSAR starting at 8pm
National
Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(HOUSTON) — The Houston Police Department has responded to an active shooter situation in a shopping center that has left multiple people wounded, according to an alert published by the city.

The suspect was shot and killed, according to police.

The Houston Fire Department confirmed to ABC News that the shooting began at 6:29 a.m. at a Petco store.

Local ABC affiliate KTRK reported that seven people were injured in the attack. Police said the individuals have been transported to area hospitals.

"At this time, the shooting scene is believed to be contained, but residents are asked to please avoid the area of Wesleyan St, between Westpark Drive and Bissonnet Street as it is still an active response and investigation scene," the alert read.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Ray Dotch, brother-in-law of Keith Lamont Scott, who was killed by police in Charlotte last week, Monday called for the full police video of the incident to be released and said that he hopes Americans will take "an absolute unflinching look" at prejudice and police-involved shootings and that "we as a nation tell the truth about who we are."

Dotch told Good Morning America Monday that the partial video of the encounter Tuesday between Scott and Charlotte police which the police department released Saturday "left us with more questions than with answers" about the shooting.

"We're, first, happy they released" the partial video, Dotch told ABC News' George Stephanopoulos. "Our absolute first goal is to get to the absolute truth ... We're still trying to understand how it came to be that this particular moment led to the loss of life."

Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina, released some of the police department's tapes of the fatal shooting of Scott on Saturday, and Police Chief Kerr Putney said more footage will come later.


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

Dotch said that in the wake of the tragedy, "My family is trying to expand the conversation beyond just us."

"My hope on all of this is that the only way that Keith and all of the others' lives will not be in vain is if we as a nation tell the truth about who we are, about the inherent prejudices that we carry as a nation, that we've always carried," Dotch said.

"When you see my sister as your sister, when you see Keith Lamont Scott as your brother and not just my brother, when we stand together as a United States and say enough of this then we're making forward progress," he said.

Dotch acknowledged that he and his family are grieving Scott's death.

"We're holding it together," he said.


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(VINTON, Iowa) — Iowa residents awaited nervously Monday as the swollen Cedar River rose steadily to its highest levels since a devastating flood in 2008 that caused some $10 billion in damages and took one life.

The river crested in the town of Vinton at just under 22 feet at 3 a.m. Monday, less than three ft. shy of the record hit back in 2008.

Floodwaters invaded streets, inundating homes, businesses, parks, yards and stopping the circulation of vehicles in parts of the town.

"I think it could have been a lot worse," resident Becci Sloan told KCRG, a local ABC affiliate, hours before the river crested. "There's going to be a lot of trash leftover and a lot of wood and debris."

Emergency crews stood vigil, preparing for the worst.

 

IMPORTANT: Flood Evacuation Notice https://t.co/oU3mho853U
Residents in the evacuation area are strongly encouraged to leave.

— City of Cedar Rapids (@CityofCRiowa) September 25, 2016

 

Downstream, the city of Cedar Rapids urged residents in low-lying parts of the city to evacuate on Sunday, as many worked feverishly throughout the day, moving furniture, removing furnaces and other vulnerable equipment, and encircling buildings with walls of sandbags.

 

Evacuations strongly recommended in flood evacuation zone. Temp flood protection measures are no guarantee of safety.

— Cedar Rapids Police (@CR_Police) September 26, 2016

 

"Residents are reminded that 16 feet is considered major flooding, and the river is predicted to crest at 23 feet," the city warned. "Temporary flood control measures have been constructed in an effort to contain rising water, but are no guarantee of safety."

 

Latest crest forecast at Cedar Rapids is unchanged at 23 feet Tuesday morning. #iawx pic.twitter.com/9rYCeTtmr7

— NWS Quad Cities (@NWSQuadCities) September 26, 2016

 

The National Weather Service predicts the river to crest early Tuesday morning, but the rising waters were already impacting the flood evacuation zone on Sunday, where a curfew took effect at 8 p.m. and will remain in effect until the area is deemed safe.


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

Peter Zay/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — The city of Charlotte, North Carolina, announced Sunday evening that the curfew that had been imposed in response to protests after the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott had been lifted, effective immediately.

Protests were peaceful Saturday night, although some clergy and demonstrators ignored the midnight curfew to stop and pray outside the Charrlotte-Mecklenburg police headquarters, just hours after the department released body cam and dash cam video footage of the fatal shooting of Scott on Tuesday.

Demonstrators filled the streets of downtown Charlotte carrying signs that read "Hands Up, They Still Shoot," "Why Us?" "Define 'Bad Due,'" and "Black Lives Matter," but the protests were orderly.

The curfew was imposed Thursday after demonstrations over the past week have become violent, with protesters looting and vandalizing businesses, and the National Guard was called out to help maintain order.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

Skagit County DEM(BURLINGTON, Wash.) -- The suspect in the shooting at a mall in Washington state that left five people dead Friday was arrested and taken into custody Saturday evening, according to the Washington State Patrol.

The suspect was identified by police as Arcan Cetin, 20, a resident of Oak Harbor, Washington, located about 28 miles southwest of the mall where the shooting happened. He was taken into custody in Oak Harbor.

"Investigators began pursuing the different leads, and one particular tip identified Cetin as a person of interest," explained a news release from the Skagit County Department of Emergency Management. "Investigators began interviewing family and associates who are familiar with the man, and it became apparent he was likely connected to the shootings."

At a press conference Saturday night, Lt. Mike Hawley with the Island County Sheriff's Office said Cetin was taken into custody around 6:30 p.m. after his car was spotted by Oak Harbor Police Department officers. Cetin was spotted walking on the sidewalk and was then taken into custody. He was unarmed, did not resist arrest and was in a "zombie-like" state, Lt. Hawley said.

Mount Vernon Police Lt. Chris Cammock said at the press conference that Cetin's capture came after police received several tips from the public. After reviewing security footage from outside the mall, police were able to identify his car.

When asked what Cetin's motive was, Lt. Cammock said, "I have no idea," although he added officials are not ruling out terrorism.

Cetin has not been formally charged yet. He is currently being held at Skagit County Jail.

Lt. Cammock said Cetin "had been arrested in our county for a simple assault" in the past, without elaborating on the case.

Although police initially said Cetin was Hispanic, Lt. Cammock said, "He immigrated from Turkey but he is a a legal permanent resident of the United States...we will be asking [federal authorities] to look deeper into immigration issues."

Some social media users captured Cetin's capture by police in Oak Harbor.

The shooting occurred Friday evening at the Cascade Mall in Burlington, Washington, about 65 miles north of Seattle. At Saturday's press conference, Lt. Cammock said Cetin first entered the mall unarmed, and the re-entered the mall with a firearm and opened fire in the makeup department of Macy's.

Surveillance video images released by authorities showed that Cetin, whom police originally described as Hispanic and in his late teens or early 20s, went into the mall without the rifle that he shortly after brandished in the department store.

Four women, ranging in age from teens to seniors, were killed, and a man who had sustained life-threatening injuries died at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle early Saturday morning, several hours after he was taken there, said Sgt. Mark Francis, a public information officer with the Washington State Patrol.

Police have said they believe Cetin acted alone, and the FBI said it had no indication that the shooting was linked to terrorism.

The Skagit County Coroner is expected to release more information about the the victims on Monday.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(BUFFALO, N.Y.) -- Two planes collided over upstate New York Sunday morning, reportedly causing three deaths.

The incident occurred a little before 9:30 a.m., according to the Erie County Sheriff's office, when two planes that were en route to a small airport in Hamburg, New York, struck one another.

One plane came down near a barn, according to the sheriff's office, and both planes have subsequently been recovered.

The sheriff's office said three people died in the collision -- two on one plane and one on the other, according to ABC affiliate WKBW-TV in Buffalo, New York.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said that the collision occurred "in flight."

"A Cessna 120 and a Piper PA 28 made contact in flight and crashed in North Collins, NY today," the FAA said.

The agency said it would investigate the circumstances surrounding the collision.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

Peter Zay/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- A fifth night of protests kicked off Saturday in Charlotte, North Carolina, just hours after the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department finally released video footage of last Tuesday's fatal shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.

Police Chief Kerr Putney said Saturday that additional footage will be released.

In the dash cam video, Scott is seen exiting his car. He then slowly walks backwards before four shots are heard. It is unclear whether there is anything in his hands. The actual shooting is neither seen nor heard in the body cam footage.

Demonstrators filled the streets of downtown Charlotte carrying signs that read "Hands Up, They Still Shoot," "Why Us?" "Define 'Bad Due,'" and "Black Lives Matter."

Saturday night's protests were peaceful, with some clergy and demonstrators ignoring the midnight curfew to stop and pray outside the police department's headquarters.

Unlike Saturday night, some of the demonstrations over the past week have become violent and disorderly, with protesters looting and vandalizing businesses.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Just weeks before the Nov. 8 election, a federal appeals court has ruled that Ohio’s method of purging names of inactive voters from voter rolls is unconstitutional.

Ohio, a battleground state in the presidential race, removed the names of tens of thousands of registered voters under what it calls its “supplemental process."

Under this controversial method, voters were taken off the registration rolls after six years of not voting, regardless of whether they remained eligible to vote.

As ABC News reported in June, many of those removed were from low-income neighborhoods or neighborhoods that tended to vote Democrat.

Voting-rights activists argued that this method of removing voters directly violates the National Voter Registration Act, which says states can only remove voters from the rolls if they request it, die or move.

Ohio's top elections official, Secretary of State Jon Husted, defended the practice as necessary to keep registration rolls up to date and to prevent fraud.

Public policy organization Demos and the ACLU of Ohio filed a federal lawsuit against Husted, asking that the court halt the purging process and reinstate voters' names that had been purged. The suit alleged that a much larger number of infrequent Ohio voters are expected in this year's contentious presidential election. Advocates claimed that these voters would be "denied the opportunity to cast a vote that counts."

On Friday, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals sided with the plaintiffs, reversing a lower court decision in favor of Husted. The appeals court remanded the case to the district court to design a remedy.

The ACLU of Ohio celebrated the victory, voicing optimism that those purged will be able to cast their ballots in this swing state come November.

“We don’t believe that any voters should be removed from the rolls simply because they haven’t voted in a few elections,” Mike Brickner, senior policy director at the ACLU's Ohio chapter, said in a statement. “We hope that a plan will emerge soon to allow the tens of thousands of voters illegally purged from the rolls to vote in the upcoming presidential election,”

Husted expressed frustration at a ruling that he said interfered with longstanding state practice, and he vowed to appeal if whatever new rules are put in place reinstates the names of voters who have died or moved out of state.

"This ruling overturns 20 years of Ohio law and practice, which has been carried out by the last four secretaries of state, both Democrat and Republican," the Ohio secretary of state said in a statement. “It is one thing to strike down a longstanding procedure; it is another to craft a workable remedy. To that end, if the final resolution requires us to reinstate voting eligibility to individuals who have died or moved out of Ohio, we will appeal.”

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

Rakeyia Scott(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina, released some of the department's tapes of the fatal shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, which has sparked days of protests across the city.

Police Chief Kerr Putney announced the release at a news conference Saturday, saying that other footage will come later.

In the dash cam video Scott is seen exiting his car, he then walks backwards with his hands before four shots are heard. It is unclear whether there is anything in his hands.

The actual shooting is neither seen nor heard in the body cam footage.

Officer Brentley Vinson, identified by police as the officer who shot Scott, cannot be seen firing his weapon in either video.

The chief says the tapes show that Scott was "absolutely" in possession of a handgun and will offer "indisputable evidence" of the department's account, and he said that at this point, he the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department will not be charging any officer in the shooting. The North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation is also investigating the case.

Police also released photos of a handgun and holster and of a marijuana "blunt" that were taken as evidence in the case.

Putney said officers were conducting surveillance related to a warrant they intended to serve on someone else, but their attention was drawn to Scott. They saw marijuana and a weapon in Scott's car and said believed, "this is a safety issue for us and the public," the police chief said.

He said Scott was shot after he did not follow police commands to drop his weapon.

"At every encounter, people can make a decision to follow loud, verbal commands. They (officers) were reacting to what they saw and they have a duty to do so," Putney said.

He added that he believes the footage can now be released without jeopardizing the investigation.

Ray Dotch, Scott's brother-in-law, said at a press conference this evening that the family was glad that the body camera and dashcam videos have been released but added that unfortunately the family is left with more questions than answered.

Justin Bamberg, a lawyer for the Scott family said, that they appreciate that their request for the video release was heard and that it is another step in the pursuit for all the facts, but said that in his opinion, he does not see Scott look aggressive or lunge at officers.

Charles Monnett, another attorney at the press conference said that the community should express their opinions but should do it lawfully and peacefully.

The police announcement came after hundreds of people gathered in Charlotte's Marshall Park demanding the release of the police video footage, marching peacefully under the hot sun in, chanting and holding signs that said "Release the Tape."

Calls to release the footage had intensified after Scott's family released cell phone video of the moments leading up to and after the shooting Tuesday.

A woman identified as Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott, recorded the incident with her phone and the video was provided to ABC News on Friday by attorneys for the Scott family. In the video, Rakeyia Scott can be heard pleading with police to not shoot her husband, a 43-year-old black man, as officers order the man to "drop the gun." As the encounter continues, the woman yells back at police, insisting her husband is harmless and doesn't have a weapon.

"He doesn't have a gun," she says. "He has a T.B.I. [traumatic brain injury]. He's not going to do anything to you guys. He just took his medicine."

Police repeatedly scream at Keith Lamont Scott to "drop the gun" and, moments later, multiple gunshots ring out. The actual shooting is not shown on the video as Rakeyia Scott points her cellphone at the ground and screams, "Did you shoot him?" She then runs closer to the scene, angling the cellphone camera this time at the spot where her husband was shot. Scott's body is seen lying in the street surrounded by several officers.

The cellphone video was the first footage of Scott's deadly encounter with police to be publicly released. One of the attorneys representing the Scott family, Charles G. Monnett, said they released the video "in the name of truth and transparency."

During the rally Saturday in Charlotte, activists and religious leaders joined protesters' calls for investigators to release the videos. Corine Mack, president of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg NAACP, told the crowd amid cheers that the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) had launched an investigation into the case.

The DOJ's Community Relations Service has said it is "is working to maintain open lines of communication and ease tension in Charlotte," but the department has not yet decided whether to open an investigation. A Justice Department spokesman said Attorney General Loretta Lynch's remarks from Thursday, indicating the department is monitoring the case, still stand.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said its officers were searching for a suspect who had an outstanding warrant when they encountered Scott in a vehicle outside an apartment complex around 4 p.m. Tuesday. Police said Scott was not the suspect that officers sought but that he was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from the scene, and posed a threat because he was not obeying police orders to remain inside his car and drop the weapon.

Officer Vinson subsequently fired his gun, striking Scott, who police said was treated immediately and later pronounced dead, police said.

Vinson, who has been employed with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department since July 21, 2014, and is currently assigned to the metro division. He has been placed on paid administrative leave while the investigation into Scott's death is ongoing, according to Putney.

Vinson, who is black, was not wearing a body camera at the time.

Scott's family maintains he was not holding a gun and he was just waiting for his son to be dropped off from school. Justin Bamberg, a lawyer representing Scott's family, said in a statement Thursday that it's "impossible" to detect from the police footage what Scott is holding and at no point did Scott appear or act aggressively.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) -- As many as eight people were shot Saturday night in Baltimore, according to police, including a young child and her father.

Police said at this point there were no life-threatening injuries and three suspects were being pursued as of Saturday night.

According to Baltimore Police Chief of Media Relations TJ Smith, the attack appeared to be retaliatory. He said the shooters came from three different directions.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

Astrid Riecken/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- One hundred years in the making, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture opened its doors to the public Saturday in Washington, D.C.

Black Civil War veterans first suggested the museum in 1915, but it had to wait until the 21st century and for Congress to pass legislation in 2003 before plans to make the museum a reality took shape.

The 400,000-square-foot museum sits on the National Mall across from the Washington Monument. It includes 12 inaugural exhibitions and close to 37,000 artifacts, but only 3,000 will be on display.

The opening of the museum is attracting a high number of visitors with timed entry passes selling out quickly. If you cannot make it to the grand opening and are waiting for tickets, explore the NMAAHC with ABC News in this 360-degree video that features museum highlights, taking you through some of the galleries and spotlighting the museum’s signature artifacts.

Watch the full 360-degree video here.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

ZACH GIBSON/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) --  President Obama said Saturday that the nation's new African-American history museum opening in Washington, D.C., tells "an essential part of our American story."

"This national museum helps to tell a richer and fuller story of who we are," Obama said at the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. "It helps us better understand the lives, yes, of the president but also the slave, the industrialist but also the porter, the keeper of the status quo but also the activist seeking to overthrow that status quo."

The president visibly shed several tears as he told about his rides on Marine One over the National Mall watching the museum get built and thinking that one day he would visit it with his grandchildren during which he’d “hold a little hand” and “tell them the stories that are enshrined here.”

“We’ll learn about ourselves as Americans,” Obama said of the museum. “We’ll walk away that much more in love with this country. The only place on earth where this story could have unfolded.”

Obama said the history displayed in the museum is “a story that perhaps needs to be told now more than ever.”

“What this museum does show us is that even in the face of oppression, even in the face of unimaginable difficulty, America has moved forward,” the president said. “It is in this embrace of truth as best as we can know it and the celebration of the entire American experience where real patriotism lies.”

After his speech, Obama rang in the opening by clanging a 500-pound bell from the First Baptist Church in Williamsburg, Virginia, which was founded by slaves and free blacks in 1776.

The president and first lady Michelle Obama sat on the stage alongside former first lady Laura Bush and President George W. Bush, who in 2003 signed into law a bill to move forward with the building of the museum.

Also in attendance at the star-studded ceremony were former Pres. Bill Clinton, Chief Justice John Roberts, Will Smith, Oprah Winfrey, Vice President Biden, House Speaker Paul Ryan and former Secretary of State Colin Powell.

The Obamas have visited the museum twice ahead of its official opening. On Sept. 14, the first family got a private sneak preview of the museum, and then visited again this week where the president and first lady told "Good Morning America's" Robin Roberts of the museum's significance to children across the country.

“What I think you want is for this generation of kids to come away thinking, ‘Yeah, everybody can do everything,’ that if you're a little white boy or a little white girl, little black boy, little black girl, a Latino, Asian, if you grow up and you are gay or straight, if you are disabled, that you're empowered,” he said.

Also to be in attendance at the opening Saturday are former President George W. Bush and former First Lady Laura Bush. It was Bush who in 2003 signed into law a bill to move forward with the building of the museum. Construction broke ground on the National Mall in 2012.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- Varying interpretations have emerged of the videos that are said to show the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, after both law enforcement and the victim's family viewed the footage.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said its officers were searching for a suspect who had an outstanding warrant when they encountered Scott, a 43-year-old black man, in a vehicle outside an apartment complex around 4 p.m. Tuesday. Police said Scott was not the suspect that officers sought but that he was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from the scene, and posed a threat because he was not obeying police orders to remain inside his car and drop the weapon.

An officer subsequently fired his gun, hitting Scott, who police said was treated immediately and later pronounced dead. Police have identified the officer involved in the shooting as Brentley Vinson, who has been employed with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department since July 21, 2014, and is currently assigned to the metro division. He has been placed on paid administrative leave while the investigation into Scott's death is ongoing, according to Police Chief Kerr Putney. Vinson is African-American.

Vinson was not wearing a body camera at the time, but the other officers who responded to the incident were, police said. A dashboard camera also recorded the incident. Police have not publicly released any footage but Scott's family have reviewed the video that shows the moment when police fatally shot the man, the family's attorney told ABC News on Thursday.

What Police Say About the Videos

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said the footage shows Scott with a gun in his hand during his interaction with police officers before he was shot and killed. Police also told ABC News that the gun seen in pictures taken at the scene is the weapon they recovered.

However, Police Chief Putney admitted that the videos he reviewed do not provide "definitive visual evidence that would confirm that a person is pointing a gun."

"I did not see that in the videos that I reviewed," he told reporters Thursday. "So what I can tell you, though, is when taken in the totality of all the other evidence, it supports what we've heard and the version of the truth that we gave about the circumstances that happened that led to the death of Mr. Scott."

 Putney also said the video evidence alone does not establish whether the shooting was justified.

"We have yet to make a case solely on video," he said at a news conference today. "However, it can be compelling."

According to Putney, officers in the videos gave Scott "loud, clear, verbal commands" before Officer Vinson shot him.

"The officers gave loud, clear, verbal commands, which were also heard by many of the witnesses," the police chief said at a news conference Wednesday. "Mr. Scott exited his vehicle armed with a handgun as the officers continued to yell at him to drop it."

What the Family Says About the Videos


Scott's family has said he was holding a book, not a gun, while waiting for his son to be dropped off from school. After reviewing the footage, the family's attorney said in a statement that it's "impossible" to detect what Scott is holding and at no point did Scott appear or act aggressively.

"After watching the videos, the family again has more questions than answers," Justin Bamberg, a lawyer representing Scott's family, said in the statement Thursday. "When told by police to exit his vehicle, Mr. Scott did so in a very calm, non-aggressive manner. While police did give him several commands, he did not aggressively approach them or raise his hands at members of law enforcement at any time. It is impossible to discern from the videos what, if anything, Mr. Scott is holding in his hands."

When Bamberg spoke with ABC News today, he said there appears to be an object in Scott's left hand. But Scott was right-handed, Bamberg said, which raises the question as to why he would be holding a gun in his non-dominant hand if he were to shoot someone.

And even if Scott were in fact holding a gun, it's questionable as to whether he should have been shot and killed, Bamberg told ABC News.

 Attorneys for the Scott family provided ABC News with a cellphone video of Scott's encounter with police. The video was taken by a woman identified as Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott, who can be heard pleading with police to not shoot her husband as officers order the man to "drop the gun."

In the video, Rakeyia Scott yells back at police, insisting her husband is harmless and doesn't have a weapon.

"He doesn't have a gun," she says. "He has a T.B.I. [traumatic brain injury]. He's not going to do anything to you guys. He just took his medicine."

Police continue to yell at Scott to "drop the gun" and, moments later, multiple gunshots ring out. The actual shooting is not shown on the video as Rakeyia Scott points her cellphone at the ground and screams, "Did you shoot him?" She then runs closer to the scene, angling the cellphone camera this time at the spot where her husband was shot. Scott's body is seen lying in the street surrounded by several officers.

The cellphone video is the first footage of Scott's encounter with police to be publicly released.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  A police officers' association in California bought a bicycle for a local teenager after one cop discovered that he walks four hours to and from work every day.

Corporal Kirk Keffer of the Benicia Police Department found Jourdan Duncan, 19, walking home late one night last week, and offered to give him a ride, the Benicia Police Officers' Association said in a statement on its website.

Duncan shared his story with Keffer, telling the cop that he was saving money for college and did not have a car or bicycle. He walks from Vallejo, where he lives, to Benicia in order to get to work, according to the association. The two towns are about 8 miles apart.

Keffer then shared the youth's story with the rest of the police officers' association and on Monday evening, they surprised Duncan with a new bicycle, purchased by the association.

"You never know someone’s story until you talk to them. A young man’s work ethic and determination moved our officers to help him with his future," the Benicia Police Department said in a Facebook post.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



Subscribe To This Feed

ABC News(BALTIMORE) --  The 15-year-old girl who was pepper-sprayed by Maryland police has spoken out, sharing her account of what happened Sunday afternoon at a press conference with her mother and attorney Thursday night. Although the teen appeared at the evening press conference, her name has not been released and Ficker has asked that the media refrain from trying to identify her.

The teen said she "stood her ground" when the officers told her she was being detained and that she was "a little dizzy" and everything was "blurry" after she says she was knocked out from colliding with a car.

According to the teen’s attorney, Robin Ficker, she was riding her bike in the street when a car hit her, causing her to "flip over." She was knocked unconscious from the fall and regained consciousness about two minutes later, Ficker said.

However, on police bodycam video released by Hagerstown police yesterday, a motorist is heard telling police that the teen hit the side of his vehicle with her bicycle.

 At another press conference earlier on Thursday, Hagerstown Police Chief Victor Brito told reporters that when his officers arrived, "the juvenile had to be detained" because she began to be "assaultive" while officers attempted to question her about the traffic accident, but that his officers used the "appropriate amount of force."

According to Ficker, the teen got back on her bike and an officer grabbed her and held her tightly as another officer put her in handcuffs. Another cop pulled out a Taser when a bystander approached but the Taser was not deployed, he claims.

In the video released by police, officers can be heard telling the bystander to "get back" multiple times. An officer can then be seen telling the girl to get her hands behind her back as he tries to handcuff her, reminding her that she's "being detained right now."

Ficker also claims that police then "flung her" into the cement, and the girl hit a window sill that was protruding from a wall. He also says she was dragged and put into the back of the police car. Police never informed the teen about what was happening, Ficker said, refuting police claims that the teen was asked if she was "OK."

The teen was "never" slammed, Brito said, but was "placed" against the wall. The video shows her being carried horizontally by two police officers, prior to being put in the patrol car. Brito said the officers asked the girl repeatedly to "calm down." On the tape, while asking for the name of the mother, one officer tells her, "You help me, I'll help you." Brito says that police recognized that the girl was a minor and tried to use their "best adult tone" with her.

 Once she was placed into the police car, Ficker claims she was then pepper-sprayed four times, one time right in her mouth, and not given water. The teen said the spraying had caused her to start choking. Brito said the teen was only sprayed once and that she was able to wash her face with water when she arrived at the station, which he said is protocol.

Police slammed the car door and never put her seat belt on, Ficker said. The video shows police closing the car door after the teen was sprayed.

 She was later taken to the hospital by her father, where she was diagnosed with a possible concussion and other injuries, Ficker said.

"What happened Sunday should never happen to anyone's daughter," Ficker said, adding that the girl is an honor student and soccer player.

The teen's mother also spoke to reporters, condemning police for their treatment of a "disoriented teen" and calling the officers' actions "excessive."

She said her daughter acted the way she did because she was "confused and scared." She said her daughter could have handled the situation better, but wasn't in the right state of mind.

 The teen was charged with disorderly conduct, two counts of second-degree assault, possession of marijuana, and failure to obey a traffic device, police said. The matter was referred to the Department of Juvenile Services. She will not enter a plea, Ficker said, adding that he hopes the Department of Juvenile Services will drop the charges.

The Hagerstown Police Department said it released the videos because it "wanted to share" the perspective from the bodycam footage "to provide a better understanding of that full incident."

"Officers in this country are placed in difficult situations," Brito said Thursday. "It's their job to act in the interest of the community. The last thing we wanted to do is use any force to bring situation under control."

Brito said the officers acknowledged that the teen was a juvenile and did not use excessive force against her. According to Brito, the teen was warned "multiple times" to stop kicking officers before they pepper-sprayed her.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

0
comments



 

 

 

 

 

 

Organization of the Month

BKs Beacon Tavern

 

 

 

 

 

     Copyright WSAR

LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services